lunes, 27 de noviembre de 2006

El niño inteligente


Había una vez un niño que su sueño era resolver el maldito cubo rubick. La historia nace el día en que un tio de Estados Unidos, le trajo uno de estos juguetes en unos de sus viajes al tercermundista Chile. El niño inteligente no tenía idea de que se trataba el juego, asi que lo dejó en una repisa mientras el polvo se acumulaba en sus cuadros de colores. Un día, el niño inteligente quizo saber de que se trataba el lindo juguete, y empezó a desordenarlo para comenzar a jugar. Mientras el niño inteligente más desordenaba el cubo, más se alejaba de resolverlo. Ya estoy listo para comenzar a resolver esta lesera, dijo el niño inteligente, y comenzó el camino hacia la frustración. El niño jugó durante tres años consecutivos y nada logró, sus ánimos ya estaban por el suelo y cada vez que estaba a punto de resolver un lado, los otros continuaban en su desorden. Su cabeza maldecía a aquel tío que trajo el juguete, y el niño inteligente se aburrió y dejó el juguete botado. pasaron 86 primaveras, y el cubo seguía de la misma manera en que el niño inteligente lo había dejado, pero gracias al transcurso de los años, los colores se fueron decolorando, y el cubo quedó blanco, en todas sus caras. El niño inteligente al fin logró resolver el famoso cubo Rubick.

4 comentarios:

super heladio 3 dijo...

yo tampoco he podido armar uno de estos cubos. No creo que pueda presenciar 86 primaveras.... así que mi método para armar este artilugio era sacarle los autoadhesivos de colores y ponerlos en orden.

Que pasa weiles cabrón....
NOS nos espera.

Anónimo dijo...

creo que a mi me pasaria lo mismo pero no el 86 años, en 87!!!!!!!!!!!!

Anónimo dijo...

Hello. Prompt how to get acquainted with the girl it to me to like. But does not know about it
I have read through one history
Each of you has your personal story; it is your history. Keeping a diary or writing your feelings in a special notebook is a wonderful way to learn how to think and write about who you are -- to develop your own identity and voice.

People of all ages are able to do this. Your own history is special because of your circumstances: your cultural, racial, religious or ethnic background. Your story is also part of human history, a part of the story of the dignity and worth of all human beings. By putting opinions and thoughts into words, you, too, can give voice to your inner self and strivings.

A long entry by Anne Frank on April 5, 1944, written after more than a year and a half of hiding from the Nazis, describes the range of emotions 14-year-old Anne is experiencing:

". . . but the moment I was alone I knew I was going to cry my eyes out. I slid to the floor in my nightgown and began by saying my prayers, very fervently. Then I drew my knees to my chest, lay my head on my arms and cried, all huddled up on the bare floor. A loud sob brought me back down to earth, and I choked back my tears, since I didn't want anyone next door to hear me . . .

"And now it's really over. I finally realized that I must do my school work to keep from being ignorant, to get on in life, to become a journalist, because that's what I want! I know I can write. A few of my stories are good, my descriptions of the Secret Annex are humorous, much of my diary is vivid and alive, but . . . it remains to be seen whether I really have talent . . .

"When I write I can shake off all my cares. My sorrow disappears, my spirits are revived! But, and that's a big question, will I ever be able to write something great, will I ever become a journalist or a writer? I hope so, oh, I hope so very much, because writing allows me to record everything, all my thoughts, ideals and fantasies.

"I haven't worked on Cady's Life for ages. In my mind I've worked out exactly what happens next, but the story doesn't seem to be coming along very well. I might never finish it, and it'll wind up in the wastepaper basket or the stove. That's a horrible thought, but then I say to myself, "At the age of 14 and with so little experience, you can't write about philosophy.' So onward and upward, with renewed spirits. It'll all work out, because I'm determined to write! Yours, Anne M. Frank

For those of you interested in reading some of Anne Frank's first stories and essays, including a version of Cady's Life, see Tales From the Secret Annex (Doubleday, 1996). Next: Reviewing and revising your writing

Lovage dijo...

Buena manera de resolverlo